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New Oculus Rift 'Crescent Bay' prototype packs integrated audio and 360-degree tracking

Written By kom nampuldu on Senin, 22 September 2014 | 16.01

Kicking off day two of the Oculus Connect virtual reality conference in Los Angeles, CA, Oculus CEO Brendan Iribe took to the stage to announce a new Crescent Bay prototype—not the consumer release nor another developer kit, but a new internal stepping stone similar to the old Crystal Cove model.

"Today it is happening. Virtual reality is here," said Iribe. "We thought about flying cars, maybe hoverboards. And virtual reality. It's finally here."

First, Iribe laid out what was necessary for the consumer version of the Rift, as far as Oculus is concerned: Six degrees of freedom, 360 degree tracking, sub-millimeter accuracy, sub-20 milliseconds of latency from you moving your head to the last photon hitting your eye, persistence of less than three milliseconds, 90 hertz refresh rate, at least 1k x 1k resolution per eye, no visible pixels, a comfortable eyebox, and a field of view greater than 90 degrees.

Oculus Connect

"When you put these together, and you get it right, and you get the content right, suddenly you're there," said Iribe.

Enter Crescent Bay. Crescent Bay is the latest Rift prototype, which Iribe says is "as big of a leap from DK1 to DK2 as we've made from DK2 to Crescent Bay." 

"It's awesome," he continued.

More from Oculus Connect: Oculus open-sources original Rift developer kit's firmware, schematics, and mechanics

The core features: 360-degree tracking (there are LEDs on the back of the headset now), a quicker refresh rate, and optional integrated audio (you can move the small attached earbuds out of the way to use your own headphones) along with 360 VR audio software powered by RealSpace 3D's audio system.

crescent bay rear pers on light

The Oculus Rift Crescent Bay prototype includes LEDs on the rear of the headstrap to offer full 360-degree head tracking.

Iribe also talked about how Oculus's plans encompass both mobile and PC going forward. "Today on PC you get high fidelity and a sense of presence, which is the magic of VR," said Iribe. "With mobile the magic is accessibility, affordability, and portability." He claims that embracing both platforms is the way to "connect a billion people in VR"—a long-standing goal for the company.

They're well on the way, considering Oculus still hasn't shipped a real consumer-facing product. "There's over 100,000 Rift developer kits shipped to over 130 countries around the world. We launched two years ago," said Iribe. "That's incredible." He later said he thinks the actual number is near 130,000 development kits at this point.

Oculus Connect

Still no mention of a consumer release date, though. All we got was "We're really sprinting towards the consumer version." One of these days...

Stay tuned to PCWorld for more news from Oculus Connect—both Michael Abrash and John Carmack have keynotes later today. Or, for up to the minute news, feel free to follow my Twitter feed, where I'll be posting highlights and photos all day. We'll also have a hands-on with the Crescent Bay model soon.


16.01 | 0 komentar | Read More

Oculus Rift 'Crescent Bay' prototype hands-on: A VR alien waved at me and I waved back

We don't really like to swear on this site. By and large PCWorld is a family-friendly affair. Which is a shame, because at Oculus Connect on Saturday I got hands-on time with Crescent Bay, the latest internal Oculus Rift prototype and most likely the last stepping stone before the consumer Rift.

And all I can say is [redacted], it's amazing. [Redacted].

"Presence"

In case you missed the announcement Saturday morning, here's a quick rundown of what Crescent Bay entails. It's not a new development kit. You'll never be able to buy it. Instead, like the Crystal Cove model demoed by Oculus at CES earlier this year it's an internal prototype—a benchmark of what the company is aiming for.

According to Oculus CEO Brendan Iribe's keynote, the step from the newly-released DK2 to Crescent Bay is as big as the step between the first-gen (DK1) and second-gen (DK2) developer's kit models. If you've used the DK1 and DK2 you know what an incredible difference that is. If you haven't, imagine the only television set you've used your entire life is a grainy old 70s CRT and then somebody played you a movie in full HD for the first time.

Crescent Bay increases the resolution yet again (rumors say it's probably the 1440p screen used in the Note 4, though Oculus was for some reason hesitant to let me crack open one of their few Crescent Bay models just to look at the screen). Along with the higher resolution you get a higher refresh rate, which should again decrease the amount of judder (and thus your likelihood to get motion-sick).

oculus crescent bay

The Oculus Rift Crescent Bay prototype.

You'll also notice some cosmetic differences—namely, that there are now white dots all over the outside again including the back of the headband and that two tiny headphones hang down from the sides. Crescent Bay features full positional tracking, even from behind, and integrated 3D audio.

The key word for Crescent Bay is "presence." Iribe said it about a dozen times during his keynote and then another dozen times during a behind-closed-doors speech to press. By that, he means forgetting that you're staring at a virtual world. Iribe claims this is the point—this is where VR becomes a real thing.

Reflexes

But that's all marketing speak. What's it actually like?

Like every iteration thus far, Crescent Bay comes with a brand new demo to show off its capabilities. A set of demos, really. In the ten or so minutes that I wore Crescent Bay, I think I saw eight or nine distinct demos, each designed to show off a certain aspect of the unit.

Oh, and big news: You stand. Oculus has been notoriously reticent about standing while using the Rift. John Carmack's keynote during Connect even featured him speaking at length about "Swivel Chair VR" because the company views standing use as a liability. Except, apparently, when it comes to the Crescent Bay demo.

oculus crescent bay pc world 01

Author Hayden Dingman settling into the Oculus Rift Crescent Bay demo at Oculus Connect.

I was brought into a small cubicle with a grey mat on the ground and told I could walk, crawl, whatever on the gray mat, but would be stopped from leaving the mat with the headset on. The Rift was placed over my head, the hanging headphones adjusted onto my ears, and we were off.

The first demo was fairly rote. The Rift turned on and I found myself standing in a beautifully rendered but empty corridor, all industrial steel and green lighting. It was clear that the resolution has gone up since the DK2, though you can still see individual pixels if you try. And I tried, especially because I was just standing in this boring green room.

Still, I walked around a bit, looked at some gauges. The position tracking worked, even when I turned fully around.

Let me say that again: I reflexively waved at a virtual alien.

I then loaded (to the best of my memory) into a dark room with a raptor, which roared at me, and then into a cartoonish, flat-shaded scene on a beach. There was a small campfire, a moose, and a fox. Again, I kind of just looked around, walked a bit. Walking is harder with the Rift than you might expect—even when you know there are no obstacles to trip over, it's still hard to convince your brain to just walk like a normal human.

"Okay, so this is Crescent Bay," I thought. And then the scene shifted...

...And I was standing on the edge of a skyscraper, traffic passing miles below. A zeppelin floated above, next to an Oculus-branded skyscraper. There was a bridge off to the side.

It took me a bit to realize all of this, because I was too busy looking down. Had somebody turned on a fan at that moment I might have yelled—for a brief moment Iribe's "presence" marketing crap was a real thing. I honestly believed I was on a ledge.

Not consciously, of course. Your brain's not dumb. It knows you're standing in a room in a hotel in Los Angeles, wearing a goofy-looking headset. Hell, you're all-too-aware of the iconic "I'm wearing a Rift and my forehead is slightly sweaty" feeling.

But on a different level it didn't matter. I was on that ledge.

oculus crescent bay 2

The rear of the Oculus Rift Crescent Bay headstrap is adorned with LEDs to enable full 360-degree positional head tracking.

Two other demos sparked this feeling in me:

In one, you're standing on a barren, rocky planet as an expertly-rendered alien talks to you in an unfamiliar language, occasionally yelling at you or smiling. And then the alien raised up a hand and waved. Before I really understood what I was doing, I'd already raised my own hand reflexively.

Let me say that again: I waved at a virtual alien.

Then there's the Showdown demo, which closed out our time with Crescent Bay. Showdown was designed by Epic, and features a battle between a group of soldiers and a massive robot. The camera moves inexorably down the street towards the robot while the action progresses around you in slow motion—bullets ripple towards the robot in trademark Matrix fashion, a car explodes and flips over your head, and rubble flies through the air. It was the last category that got me: As rubble flew towards my face, I jerked backwards expecting to feel concrete hit me in the face.

While "Presence" and this sense of realism is incredible, some of the other demos were just as impressive for entirely different reasons. One brief section had me standing over a neon orange map, beacons shining into the sky from the heart of each city. I could easily see playing a real-time or turn-based strategy game from this viewpoint—the art style made me think of DEFCON, but any God-view game would work.

And finally, one demo I was merely floating in space next to a small model town, as if someone had built a model railroad and left it there for me. This scene was the best demonstration of Oculus's new audio focus, with sound fading in and out seamlessly as I leaned around the town. Positional audio isn't exactly a new idea, but it's amazing how much it can help improve the "reality" part of VR.

oculus crescent bay 3

The Oculus Rift Crescent Bay prototype ads integrated headphones, which you can see in this picture.

The catch—literally

The biggest downside with Crescent Bay, and presumably the final consumer Rift model? That damn cord. Moving around the room with a cable attached to your head is an enormous distraction, and multiple times I got really into the scene only to be jarred out of it by a tugging feeling on the side of my head. Obviously it also makes spinning around in a circle a disaster.

There's also the question of setting everything up. In the demo room, the positional camera was mounted on the wall. That's even less portable than the DK2's "mount this on top of your monitor" camera, and I'm curious whether standing is a use case Oculus is actually fully promoting or whether it was simply for demo purposes.

As for the headphones, I'm currently ambivalent. I didn't get a great look at the headphones and the Oculus staffer in my room refused to answer any questions or let me see the unit closer, but they appear to swivel out of the way when you want to wear real headphones. In other words, I don't think they detach completely. The audio quality was fine for demo purposes, but that's about the most I can say—a crowded convention isn't the best place to test audio fidelity.

Bottom line

It's impressive, though. To think that we've gone from DK1 to Crescent Bay in approximately two years...well, it's mind-blowing. Still, the main problem for Oculus at this point is to release a product. Hopefully our current indications are correct and this is at long last the final step before a consumer rift release.

Because they've already made me a believer. Hell, I was a believer after I used a DK1 for the first time. Now the only challenge is to get you to believe too.


16.01 | 0 komentar | Read More

Microsoft, Getty copyright dispute heads for mediation

A judge in New York has postponed for mediation proceedings a decision on an injunction motion by Getty Images against a Bing widget, which allowed publishers to embed image collages and slideshows from search results on their websites.

Getty had earlier this month filed a complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York against Microsoft, in which it alleged that the image galleries and slideshows typically consist of copyrighted images, including those owned or controlled by Getty.

Microsoft said it had temporarily removed the Bing Image Widget, which was in its beta, so it could talk with Getty and better understand its concerns.

In a court filing, the software company said a preliminary injunction wasn't required as it had voluntarily disabled the widget a day after learning of Getty's claims and subsequently agreed to change it to use only licensed images until a decision in the case. The company plans to relaunch the widget only in the modified form. Getty could hence not claim any irreparable harm without an injunction, Microsoft argued.

Getty has countered in a filing last week that the widget remains operational across websites worldwide, to which Microsoft continues to supply images, including Getty's copyrighted images, without a license to do so.

Microsoft has also held it cannot be liable because its widget never actually copies or displays any copyrighted works, but supplies to the third-party user's website an "HTML address pointing to where the images are located, not the images themselves." The image host site to which Microsoft's code points in the collage view is its own server containing images that it copied from the Internet at large, Getty countered.

In an order made public Friday, District Judge Denise Cote ordered that the motion for preliminary injunction "is stayed until October 3, 2014 while the parties engage in mediation." Getty has to file any amended complaint by Friday.


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IEEE standards group wants to bring order to IoT

Written By kom nampuldu on Minggu, 21 September 2014 | 16.01

The IEEE is embarking on an ambitious effort to build a overarching architecture for the Internet of Things, spanning a multitude of industries and technologies.

IEEE P2413, which the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers officially started work on in July, would form a framework for interoperability among connected devices and related applications in home automation, industrial systems, telematics and all other sectors that are expected to use IoT in the coming years. While leaving room for differences across those industries, the standard would allow for sharing of data across IoT systems, according to Oleg Logvinov, chair of the IEEE P2413 Working Group.

"The activities in the Internet of Things today are disjointed," Logvinov said Thursday at the IEEE Standards Association IoT Workshop in Mountain View, California.

IDC analyst Michael Palma, who also spoke at the workshop, counted seven industry groups plus the IEEE that are working in this area. They include enterprise-level bodies such as the Industrial Internet Consortium and more consumer-focused efforts such as AllJoyn.

"What they need is the Rosetta Stone to make everything talk and work together," Palma said.

A unifying force

IEEE is a powerful international body that's set the standards for, among other things, ethernet and wireless LANs. But the P2413 Working Group, which first met in July, doesn't want to replace existing IoT groups. Rather it aims to create a standard architecture so IoT systems for all industries can work together.

"They need a place where they can come together and move forward as a scalable, unified platform," Logvinov said. "That type of unification can be enabled only by a global, international standard."

Logvinov and others at the event compared today's IoT to a group of islands. To form the greater whole that IoT can be, there's a need for bridges between those islands and eventually a merging into one land mass that can house the equivalent of a big city, they said. The benefits of bringing different areas of IoT together could include economies of scale, lower hardware prices and future applications as yet unimagined.

That problem exists in a nutshell in the medical equipment industry, according to Dr. Julian Goldman, director of medical device interoperability at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The makers of various types of devices for monitoring patients' health don't design their products to share data or even acknowledge one another, so doctors can't get as good information as they might, he said. For example, measurements taken by a blood oxygen sensor on a patient's finger can be affected by the actions of a blood-pressure monitor that squeezes the patient's arm, but the systems don't automatically account for that effect, Goldman said.

"If we don't look at the lessons today in health care, the Internet of Things is not going to be an Internet of Things, it's going to be a pile of things," Goldman said.

A standard by 2016?

The P2413 group hopes to define the basic building blocks of IoT systems that are common across industries, Logvinov said. Among other things, it hopes to turn the information coming from different platforms into commonly understood data objects, he said. It hopes to finish the standard by 2016, a goal that Logvinov acknowledged is ambitious.

A standard that spans IoT will be hard to build, but so will IoT itself, which may represent the next phase of the industrial revolution, he said.

"It's worth the effort," Logvinov said. "It's worth trying to build."

There are too many vendors and groups pushing overlapping specifications for IoT, said Michael Holdmann, executive vice president of sales, marketing and strategy at Coversant, in an interview at the forum. Coversant sells communications software that's used in some IoT systems today.

"People are just trying to do things that are already out there," Holdmann said.

He welcomes the P2413 effort but said it will be important for the group to coordinate with other organizations. In time, people trying to use IoT will demand some kind of order, he said. "The market is going to drive the standards bodies to cooperate."

Coordination with other organizations, including ETSI (the European Telecommunications Standards Institute), ISO (International Organization for Standardization) and the machine-to-machine group oneM2M, is part of the P2413 game plan, Logvinov said. There are currently 23 vendors and organizations represented in the P2413 group, including Cisco Systems, Huawei Technologies, General Electric, Oracle, Qualcomm and the ZigBee Alliance.


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Oculus open-sources original Rift developer kit's firmware, schematics, and mechanics

Kicking off the Oculus Connect conference in Los Angeles this weekend, Oculus's Nirav Patel announced that the original Oculus Rift developer kit (DK1) is now fully open-source, with the exception of the pieces that aren't actually in production anymore—for instance, the display, which is no longer manufactured.

"We don't want everyone to have to take the same risks we took. We just want to share the things we learned so you don't have to do that. We're all in this to build virtual reality together," said Patel.

Those risks were the focus of Patel's talk, which discussed the manufacturing of the DK1. "We found just about the roughest and quickest contract manufacturer we could find in China," said Patel. "We were a ragtag group of ten people nobody had ever heard of trying to create a product nobody thought was possible."

He discussed the different challenges the team encountered trying to get the original Oculus out the door, such as the trip where they spent hours rubbing different foam materials on their face to find one that was comfortable enough for prolonged use.

Or the last-minute panel change that almost screwed the project—"We initially started with this 5.6 inch panel in the Rift," said Patel, "But ultimately that thing ended up being end-of-lifed before we could get our hands on them, so we had this mad rush to switch to this 7" panel which resulted in this big lunchbox thing."

As a result, the DK1 had all sorts of underutilized screen real estate hidden behind the lenses, but it was a compromise the Oculus team had to make to get the product out the door. Other things Patel acknowledged were ill-planned: The removable eye lenses that let dust in, the weird adjustment slots on the side that needed a coin or screwdriver to turn, et cetera.

But with the DK2 out, Oculus decided it was time to put out the DK1 to the community. And they really mean the community. Many of the files would require high-end equipment that most people won't have access to, so Oculus is hoping the community will come together to make some easy 3D printable files and the like.

The files are out there, though, if you want them. "Really we're more interested in seeing what people do with the individual components," said Patel. He said an enterprising person could even make low-latency trackers based off Oculus's design and sell them to interested people—the licenses are that open.

And, of course, "There's also the CAD for the carrying case if you want a cool fashion accessory."

As for when the DK2 will go open source? Patel's keeping quiet for now. "Even opening the DK1 was a debate we had internally for the last year or so," he said. Fingers crossed, DIY community.


16.01 | 0 komentar | Read More

New Oculus Rift 'Crescent Bay' prototype packs integrated audio and 360-degree tracking

Kicking off day two of the Oculus Connect virtual reality conference in Los Angeles, CA, Oculus CEO Brendan Iribe took to the stage to announce a new Crescent Bay prototype—not the consumer release nor another developer kit, but a new internal stepping stone similar to the old Crystal Cove model.

"Today it is happening. Virtual reality is here," said Iribe. "We thought about flying cars, maybe hoverboards. And virtual reality. It's finally here."

First, Iribe laid out what was necessary for the consumer version of the Rift, as far as Oculus is concerned: Six degrees of freedom, 360 degree tracking, sub-millimeter accuracy, sub-20 milliseconds of latency from you moving your head to the last photon hitting your eye, persistence of less than three milliseconds, 90 hertz refresh rate, at least 1k x 1k resolution per eye, no visible pixels, a comfortable eyebox, and a field of view greater than 90 degrees.

Oculus Connect

"When you put these together, and you get it right, and you get the content right, suddenly you're there," said Iribe.

Enter Crescent Bay. Crescent Bay is the latest Rift prototype, which Iribe says is "as big of a leap from DK1 to DK2 as we've made from DK2 to Crescent Bay." 

"It's awesome," he continued.

More from Oculus Connect: Oculus open-sources original Rift developer kit's firmware, schematics, and mechanics

The core features: 360-degree tracking (there are LEDs on the back of the headset now), a quicker refresh rate, and optional integrated audio (you can move the small attached earbuds out of the way to use your own headphones) along with 360 VR audio software powered by RealSpace 3D's audio system.

crescent bay rear pers on light

The Oculus Rift Crescent Bay prototype includes LEDs on the rear of the headstrap to offer full 360-degree head tracking.

Iribe also talked about how Oculus's plans encompass both mobile and PC going forward. "Today on PC you get high fidelity and a sense of presence, which is the magic of VR," said Iribe. "With mobile the magic is accessibility, affordability, and portability." He claims that embracing both platforms is the way to "connect a billion people in VR"—a long-standing goal for the company.

They're well on the way, considering Oculus still hasn't shipped a real consumer-facing product. "There's over 100,000 Rift developer kits shipped to over 130 countries around the world. We launched two years ago," said Iribe. "That's incredible." He later said he thinks the actual number is near 130,000 development kits at this point.

Oculus Connect

Still no mention of a consumer release date, though. All we got was "We're really sprinting towards the consumer version." One of these days...

Stay tuned to PCWorld for more news from Oculus Connect—both Michael Abrash and John Carmack have keynotes later today. Or, for up to the minute news, feel free to follow my Twitter feed, where I'll be posting highlights and photos all day. We'll also have a hands-on with the Crescent Bay model soon.


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Samsung launches free'My Knox' app for securing its latest smartphones

Written By kom nampuldu on Sabtu, 20 September 2014 | 16.01

Samsung on Thursday announced price reductions and updates for its Knox security and management software for IT shops and a free My Knox service that is directly available to professionals using ActiveSync.

My Knox can be installed on a user's Galaxy S5 or Galaxy Note 4 smartphone without an IT administrator's involvement to set up a My Knox User Portal to remotely find, wipe and lock a device, according to a Samsung blog.

With My Knox, professionals can synchronize emails, calendar events and contacts between desktop computers and mobile devices, Samsung said. It creates a virtual Android partition within the mobile device that has its own home screen, launcher, apps and widget.

"If you are looking for a free security solution that ensures your privacy while providing the simplicity of having a secure workspace for email and apps that is managed by you, look no further than My Knox," Samsung's blog says.

Samsung also posted a separate blog that details its new Knox Premium and Knox Express services for IT admins to deploy cross-platform mobile security companywide.

Knox Premium for large enterprises will cost $1 per user, while Knox Express for small and medium businesses will be free. Cloud support for Knox tools had been priced as high as $3.60 per user, but Jae Shin, vice president of the Knox Business Group, recently said the price would soon go down.

"Knox Premium will be attractive to businesses because of its low cost and it will address concerns that Knox is expensive and not affordable," said Shreyas Sadalgi, senior vice president of business development at Samsung Knox partner Centrify. He spoke in a recent interview.

Samsung described Knox Premium as a "complete mobility management solution" that includes Knox Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM), which is cloud based for easy deployment. It works across other device platforms besides Android, but Samsung didn't say which ones. It also comes with online technical and phone ticket support.

Knox Express will also have Knox EMM, and will have an online portal for IT admins with support for Samsung and other Android and iOS devices, Samsung said.

Centrify provides the cloud-based identity and access management features of Knox EMM.


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IEEE standards group wants to bring order to IoT

The IEEE is embarking on an ambitious effort to build a overarching architecture for the Internet of Things, spanning a multitude of industries and technologies.

IEEE P2413, which the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers officially started work on in July, would form a framework for interoperability among connected devices and related applications in home automation, industrial systems, telematics and all other sectors that are expected to use IoT in the coming years. While leaving room for differences across those industries, the standard would allow for sharing of data across IoT systems, according to Oleg Logvinov, chair of the IEEE P2413 Working Group.

"The activities in the Internet of Things today are disjointed," Logvinov said Thursday at the IEEE Standards Association IoT Workshop in Mountain View, California.

IDC analyst Michael Palma, who also spoke at the workshop, counted seven industry groups plus the IEEE that are working in this area. They include enterprise-level bodies such as the Industrial Internet Consortium and more consumer-focused efforts such as AllJoyn.

"What they need is the Rosetta Stone to make everything talk and work together," Palma said.

A unifying force

IEEE is a powerful international body that's set the standards for, among other things, ethernet and wireless LANs. But the P2413 Working Group, which first met in July, doesn't want to replace existing IoT groups. Rather it aims to create a standard architecture so IoT systems for all industries can work together.

"They need a place where they can come together and move forward as a scalable, unified platform," Logvinov said. "That type of unification can be enabled only by a global, international standard."

Logvinov and others at the event compared today's IoT to a group of islands. To form the greater whole that IoT can be, there's a need for bridges between those islands and eventually a merging into one land mass that can house the equivalent of a big city, they said. The benefits of bringing different areas of IoT together could include economies of scale, lower hardware prices and future applications as yet unimagined.

That problem exists in a nutshell in the medical equipment industry, according to Dr. Julian Goldman, director of medical device interoperability at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The makers of various types of devices for monitoring patients' health don't design their products to share data or even acknowledge one another, so doctors can't get as good information as they might, he said. For example, measurements taken by a blood oxygen sensor on a patient's finger can be affected by the actions of a blood-pressure monitor that squeezes the patient's arm, but the systems don't automatically account for that effect, Goldman said.

"If we don't look at the lessons today in health care, the Internet of Things is not going to be an Internet of Things, it's going to be a pile of things," Goldman said.

A standard by 2016?

The P2413 group hopes to define the basic building blocks of IoT systems that are common across industries, Logvinov said. Among other things, it hopes to turn the information coming from different platforms into commonly understood data objects, he said. It hopes to finish the standard by 2016, a goal that Logvinov acknowledged is ambitious.

A standard that spans IoT will be hard to build, but so will IoT itself, which may represent the next phase of the industrial revolution, he said.

"It's worth the effort," Logvinov said. "It's worth trying to build."

There are too many vendors and groups pushing overlapping specifications for IoT, said Michael Holdmann, executive vice president of sales, marketing and strategy at Coversant, in an interview at the forum. Coversant sells communications software that's used in some IoT systems today.

"People are just trying to do things that are already out there," Holdmann said.

He welcomes the P2413 effort but said it will be important for the group to coordinate with other organizations. In time, people trying to use IoT will demand some kind of order, he said. "The market is going to drive the standards bodies to cooperate."

Coordination with other organizations, including ETSI (the European Telecommunications Standards Institute), ISO (International Organization for Standardization) and the machine-to-machine group oneM2M, is part of the P2413 game plan, Logvinov said. There are currently 23 vendors and organizations represented in the P2413 group, including Cisco Systems, Huawei Technologies, General Electric, Oracle, Qualcomm and the ZigBee Alliance.


16.01 | 0 komentar | Read More

Oculus open-sources original Rift developer kit's firmware, schematics, and mechanics

Kicking off the Oculus Connect conference in Los Angeles this weekend, Oculus's Nirav Patel announced that the original Oculus Rift developer kit (DK1) is now fully open-source, with the exception of the pieces that aren't actually in production anymore—for instance, the display, which is no longer manufactured.

"We don't want everyone to have to take the same risks we took. We just want to share the things we learned so you don't have to do that. We're all in this to build virtual reality together," said Patel.

Those risks were the focus of Patel's talk, which discussed the manufacturing of the DK1. "We found just about the roughest and quickest contract manufacturer we could find in China," said Patel. "We were a ragtag group of ten people nobody had ever heard of trying to create a product nobody thought was possible."

He discussed the different challenges the team encountered trying to get the original Oculus out the door, such as the trip where they spent hours rubbing different foam materials on their face to find one that was comfortable enough for prolonged use.

Or the last-minute panel change that almost screwed the project—"We initially started with this 5.6 inch panel in the Rift," said Patel, "But ultimately that thing ended up being end-of-lifed before we could get our hands on them, so we had this mad rush to switch to this 7" panel which resulted in this big lunchbox thing."

As a result, the DK1 had all sorts of underutilized screen real estate hidden behind the lenses, but it was a compromise the Oculus team had to make to get the product out the door. Other things Patel acknowledged were ill-planned: The removable eye lenses that let dust in, the weird adjustment slots on the side that needed a coin or screwdriver to turn, et cetera.

But with the DK2 out, Oculus decided it was time to put out the DK1 to the community. And they really mean the community. Many of the files would require high-end equipment that most people won't have access to, so Oculus is hoping the community will come together to make some easy 3D printable files and the like.

The files are out there, though, if you want them. "Really we're more interested in seeing what people do with the individual components," said Patel. He said an enterprising person could even make low-latency trackers based off Oculus's design and sell them to interested people—the licenses are that open.

And, of course, "There's also the CAD for the carrying case if you want a cool fashion accessory."

As for when the DK2 will go open source? Patel's keeping quiet for now. "Even opening the DK1 was a debate we had internally for the last year or so," he said. Fingers crossed, DIY community.


16.01 | 0 komentar | Read More

Malicious advertisements distributed by DoubleClick, Zedo networks

Written By kom nampuldu on Jumat, 19 September 2014 | 16.00

Two online advertising networks, Google's DoubleClick and Zedo, have been delivering malicious advertisements that could install malware on a person's computer, according to the security vendor Malwarebytes.

The Times of Israel, The Jerusalem Post and the Last.fm music services were among the websites serving the malicious advertisements, wrote Jerome Segura, a senior security researcher with Malwarebytes, in a blog post.

"We rarely see attacks on a large scale like this," he wrote.

Although ad networks try to filter out malicious ones, occasionally bad ones slip in, which on a high-traffic site means a large pool of potential victims. Websites that serve the ads are usually unaware of the problem.

"What is important to remember is that legitimate websites entangled in this malvertising chain are not infected," Segura wrote. "The problem comes from the ad network agency itself."

DoubleClick and Zedo officials couldn't immediately be reached for comment.

Segura wrote that the ads direct victims to sites hosting the "Nuclear" exploit kit, which attempts to see if a computer is running vulnerable versions of Adobe Systems' Flash program or Internet Explorer, among others.

A successful attack will install the "Zemot" malware, which can connect to a remote server and download other malicious applications.

Segura wrote that Malwarebytes is still investigating, but that the company had warned The Times of Israel.


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